Best Cinematic Love Quotes

Two years ago, I shared a list of some of my favorite literary love quotes of all time. The list appealed to bibliophiles of all kinds, and remains one of my most popular blogs to date! This year, in honor of Valentine’s Day, I would like to bring my movie-loving readers five of my favorite cinematic love quotes. I’m a bit of a romantic comedy junkie, so this may get interesting! ūüôā

Enjoy the list, and please feel free to add your own favorites in the comments section below!

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1.¬†“I love that you get cold when it’s 71 degrees out. I love that it takes you an hour and a half to order a sandwich. I love that you get a little crinkle above your nose when you’re looking at me like I’m nuts. I love that after I spend the day with you, I can still smell your perfume on my clothes. And I love that you are the last person I want to talk to before I go to sleep at night. And it’s not because I’m lonely, and it’s not because it’s New Year’s Eve. I came here tonight because when you realize you want to spend the rest of your life with somebody, you want the rest of your life to start as soon as possible.”
When Harry Met Sally (1989)

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2. “It’s gotta be that can’t eat, can’t sleep, reach for the stars, over the fence, World Series kind of thing.” – It Takes Two (1995)

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3. “If I hadn’t been Fox Books and you hadn’t been The Shop Around the Corner, and you and I had just, well, met… I would have asked for your number and I wouldn’t have been able to wait 24 hours before calling you and saying, ‘Hey, how about… oh, how about some coffee, or, you know, drinks or dinner or a movie… for as long as we both shall live?'” – You’ve Got Mail (1998)

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4. “You had me at hello.” – Jerry Maguire (1996)

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5. “The best kind of love is the kind that awakens the soul and makes us reach for more, that plants a fire in our hearts and brings peace to our minds.” – The Notebook (2004)

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Well, friends, what are some of your favorites?

The Friday Five: Types of Romantic Comedy Couples

pexels-photo-196664.jpegWith Valentine’s Day just around the corner, it’s likely (and natural!) that my blog will revolve around relationships even more than usual this month. After all, aren’t the images of love¬†and ridiculous grand gestures exactly what the media wants to ingrain in our consumer-driven/chocolate-addicted minds? That’s why we watch romantic comedies in our oversized sweatshirts while choosing to ignore the huge gaps between art and real life. It’s also why we conveniently forget how formulaic most of the films in this genre can be, and instead breathe a sigh of relief at the end when the lead actor and actress finally admit their undying love for one another.

Face it — there are only so many variations of “couples” and characters that romantic comedies have the time and creativity to introduce to us. Maybe Katherine Heigl started playing her after Meg Ryan traded in for a new face, or perhaps Josh Duhammel has become the new Richard Gere (ew), but at their very core, most rom coms are more or less the same story, same characters.

This week, we’ll poke fun at some of the couples we encounter in romantic comedies. All of these couples can be well-written and fleshed out, but then there are the ones that the writers got lazy working on. Feel free to add your own in the comments!

The Friday Five: Types of Romantic Comedy Couples

1. The best friends.
Audiences have always rooted for this couple. Why? Because audiences identify with this couple. (After all, who didn’t¬†root for Harry and Sally?)¬†Most people have at least one close friend of the opposite sex, and therefore, the idea that two best friends could be soulmates gives them hope that if nothing else works out, they always have a relationship to fall back on.¬†These movies usually turn out as follows: Flashback to the beginning of the friendship (often, but not always, during childhood or college), followed by a flash forward to current state of friendship, in which both parties may act as wingmen for one another. Person A enters a relationship with a secondary character and it becomes serious. Person B undergoes a life-changing experience that causes him/her to realize that he/she has been in love with Person A the entire time. Insert emotional outburst from Person B that erupts in a passionate kiss. Cue thunder and rain. Person A storms off after Person B gives a speech about how Person A is just closing himself/herself off to true love to avoid getting hurt by something as real as their long-lasting friendship. Cue montage of Person A acting distracted around his/her clueless significant other and staring sadly out a window or two. Finally, Person A breaks things off with aforementioned significant other and runs to meet Person B (who is about to make some huge decision), prepared with an apologetic speech consisting of all the things he/she loves about Person B and something along the lines of “I just didn’t realize my soulmate was right in front of me all along.”¬†The two kiss again under fireworks or some other romantic surroundings and the scene closes. Sound familiar? That’s because it is.

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2. The sworn enemies.
Katherine Heigl, this one is for you. Some romantic comedy characters love to argue for no discernible reason at all, and so when they find someone who loves to push the envelope, sparks begin to fly. The best part about this couple is that their banter doesn’t even have to be that witty — as long as the characters try to use words that the writer picked out of his pocket thesaurus, audiences will cling to the “sexual tension” and “unbridled passion” that the two share. After all, kissing someone you hate is a great way to shut them up, am I right? (Author’s note to Katherine Heigl: Meg Ryan has played this role in a much more likable way.)

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3. The uptight working woman and the man who helps her break loose.
I’ve always had a problem with this couple because it assumes that all successful, career-driven women: a) Don’t care at all about dating or their social lives and instead choose to sacrifice their happiness, which can only be fulfilled by a relationship; and b) Refuse to wear their hair in anything other than a really tight bun. All semi-feminist rants aside, these films usually pair up a carefree guy who has had few (if any) real responsibilities in his life with a workaholic leading lady who stopped responding to men’s advances or pursuing relationships because (as we learn in the second half of the movie) she had her heart broken and has learned to adjust by burying herself in Excel spreadsheets and expense reports. Usually in these movies, each character takes a little something from the other — the woman learns to let her hair down (literally – she takes it out of the ponytail/bun in a moment of weakness while her glasses are off, and the male lead finally realizes just how beautiful she is) and accept a relationship, while the man finally gets a job and learns to be more reliable.

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4. The player who finally finds the girl he is willing to settle down for.
This is the story of a guy who likes a girl but struggles to give up his womanizing ways. The girl recognizes this from the beginning and therefore plays hard to get, while the guy realizes that she is the first real challenge he has ever had in his life. This alone makes him fall madly in love with her, and as he finds himself doing thoughtful things for her in the hopes of getting what he wants, he realizes that she is worth more than her looks. In the end, he relinquishes his Heartbreaker title and lives happily ever after with one woman. (This couple is also one that I have difficulty supporting, because¬†it leads younger girls to believe that the guy who cheats on his girlfriends will change for them — and unfortunately, that’s not usually the case.)

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5. The conspirators.
According to this couple’s track record, if you ever pretend¬†to be in a relationship with someone, you will eventually fall in love with that person. These two characters fake a relationship for some other benefit (for example, they stage a wedding so that they can use the gifts to furnish their homes and pay off debts — thank you for that, My Fake Fiancee!)¬†but in the process, they realize that they have developed feelings for one another. Finally, the whole sham unravels when one admits this to the other, before they ultimately reunite under romantic yet humorous conditions.

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Who are your favorite/least favorite romantic comedy couples?

The Friday Five: Sweetest Chick Flick Endings

After my previous, less romantic post, I thought it would be nice to give this week a fairy-tale ending. Although I generally like to tear down those romantic comedy films because of the effects they have on (mostly female) audiences, I admit that they have always been a guilty pleasure. Maybe they aren’t realistic, but we are allowed to have hope from time to time, and so this week, I would like to present some of the more aww-worthy romantic comedy endings. (Feel free to call me a sap!)

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The Friday Five: Sweetest Chick Flick Endings

1. Never Been Kissed (1999)
A copy editor in her mid-twenties, the dorky Josie Geller longs for love, and – as the title of the movie suggests – has never even been kissed. Naturally, she ends up going undercover as a high school student in order to write an expose on the popular students’ lives, and falls in love with her English teacher. A little crazy and unethical, yes, but it takes place in the 90’s — a decade of really bad but still insanely adorable teen movies — so it’s all sort of forgivable. When she is revealed as an undercover reporter and declares her love for her teacher at a big baseball game, the following ensues. Even if you aren’t particularly moved by the illegalities of it all, you have to love the Beach Boys music playing in the background. “Don’t worry, baby…” ūüôā

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2. You’ve Got Mail (1998)
In this remake of The Shop Around The Corner, Meg Ryan plays the owner of a small bookshop, who falls for a man with whom she has only corresponded by email. Meanwhile, Tom Hanks plans to build a huge chain bookstore across the street, which will be sure to put Ryan’s shop out of business, and so they develop an adversarial relationship. As fate would have it (of course!), Tom Hanks happens to be the mystery man she has been emailing. In the end, they manage to put their differences aside and admit their feelings for each other in real life.

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3. He’s Just Not That Into You (2009)
This is one of those ensemble cast movies that features several love stories, but smack dab in the middle of all of them is the story of Gigi, a sweet girl who overanalyzes potential relationships too often, and Alex,¬†the uncommitted but friendly guy who helps her recognize all the lies she’s been telling herself about the world of dating. Although I don’t totally buy Alex’s profound realization¬†in this end scene, I am a sucker for this ending. Maybe again this has something to do with the music in the background (Somewhere Only We Know¬†happens to be one of my favorite songs) but I do think it was a clever — and sweet! — way to wrap up the characters’ story.

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4. When Harry Met Sally (1989)
What kind of list would this be if it didn’t feature multiple Meg Ryan films? (Trust me, there are plenty of other good ones that didn’t make the list but still deserve to be there.) Disregarding the big hair, it is one of my favorite movies of all time. It begs the question “Can a man and a woman be friends without sex getting in the way?” Harry and Sally grow close over a period of 11 years, but eventually their feelings do get in the way and we end the movie with this gem. Possibly the sweetest “grand gesture speech” I have ever heard in a movie. Although it may not be the most realistic at times, I think When Harry Met Sally¬†is the kind of love story most people want to find in their own lives. Wouldn’t it be great if the perfect person for us was right under our nose all along?

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5. Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961)
Okay, so this one isn’t exactly a “romantic comedy” or “chick flick,” but it does have those romantic elements and definitely the perfect ending, in spite of the fact that it differs from the novel. All iconic aspects of the movie aside, it has such a lovely Old Hollywood ending that current films just can’t duplicate, with great speeches from the characters and gorgeous visuals.

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What are your favorite movie endings?

The Freshman 15: College Relationship Tips

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With pink and red decor filling the shops, jewelry commercials dominating the airwaves and delicious chocolates hitting the shelves, it is easy to see that Valentine’s Day (or Singles Awareness Day, depending on your perspective) is here. No matter where you go — work, school, lunch, the grocery store — you can’t completely escape this holiday, whether you like it or not.

Regardless of any romantic entanglements this year, I though that this month would be the perfect time to address college relationships in this month’s Freshman 15. Whether you’re single or taken, these tips will help you navigate any college relationship.¬†Tweet this!

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The Freshman 15: College Relationship Tips

1. Don’t force a relationship out of nothing.
I see this happen to college students quite often. A boy and a girl who consider each other somewhat attractive wind up in a compromising situation that leads to some kind of hook-up, and the next day, feel obligated to call it a relationship. Maybe it’s a guilt thing; if things work out, they can later say it was “love at first sight,” that they looked into each other’s eyes and just knew. Or maybe this is just their way of following one of those romantic comedy misconceptions — the idea that a random hook-up will ultimately become your soulmate. It happened to Emily and Oliver in A Lot Like Love, it happened to Hugh Grant and Andie McDowell in Four Weddings and a Funeral, and it happened to Blair and Chuck on Gossip Girl. The truth is, although these types of relationships seem ideal in the movies, that isn’t always the case in real life. Don’t force a relationship out of thin air; accept that some attraction is fleeting. (Editor’s Note: Don’t deny chemistry, either. If you already liked the person and you happened to end up in the aforementioned compromising situation, don’t write things off completely if there might be something there.)

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2. Never trust too easily.
Let’s face it – not everyone has the best of intentions. One difference between high school and college relationships is that in high school, you have a smaller pool of potential boyfriends and girlfriends, and it is likely you have known most of them since you were kids. Therefore, even though people change over time, your judgment in choosing a significant other is probably better because you have known these people for a while. In college, however, you are often thrust into a completely new social circle, and because of this, you don’t know much about the true character of that cute guy you met in the dining hall. You don’t need to be completely paranoid, but be careful when you place your trust in others. Don’t open yourself up to someone who doesn’t deserve it.

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3. Avoid comparisons.
Chances are, you and your significant other will probably tell stories about exes from time to time, and that is totally normal. However, don’t go on too much about your past relationships. There is a reason those ended, and if all you ever do is talk about all the nice things your ex did, your current significant other will probably either feel inadequate or annoyed.

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4. Keep some things to yourself.
Although your friends are probably thrilled for you, they don’t need to hear every last detail about how much you love your significant other or how the two of you spend every second of the day. This is a real life case of “Don’t kiss and tell!”

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5. First impressions will only take you so far.
Yes, first impressions are important in many scenarios, but keep in mind that things can change over time. For example, at my freshman orientation at college, the guy I thought disliked me and was too cool for me wound up becoming one of my best friends. Conversely, there have been times when I met people and thought we would be close, and they ended up disappointing me. You have to be receptive to the way people change, and be open to the fact that some people may surprise you (in good or bad ways).

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6. Go on dates.
This may sound obvious enough, but so many people forget about dating and end up sinking right into a married couple routine. Comfort is great, but in your late teens and early twenties, do you really want to lose all sense of romance? Hanging out in a dorm room all the time can get boring really quickly. Don’t let that happen to you while you are still in college!

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7. Avoid U-Hauling.
In the past, I have cited U-Hauling (or the phenomenon of a relationship moving way too quickly, to the point where you have practically moved in together after a few weeks) as one of the major problems of college relationships. In general, college relationships tend to be accelerated forms of adult relationships — especially when you’re in the dorm rooms — because your social lives begin to meld into your home lives. Early on, it’s likely you will run into each other getting groceries, doing laundry, taking out trash, completing chores, etc. If your significant other’s parents are in town, it is also likely you will meet them regardless of how long you have been dating. While many of these things are inevitable, it is important to maintain some semblance of mystery in the relationship. Don’t spend every waking moment together. (Editor’s note: I would like to credit my friend Jen for introducing me to the whole U-Hauling concept. Her blog entry about it was pretty informative!)

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8. Don’t neglect your friends.
You only have so much free time, so it can be difficult to distribute it equally between your friends and your boyfriend or girlfriend. However, you have to keep your friends in mind — even when your significant other is a temporary fixture (which, chances are, he/she is), your friends are a more permanent part of your life, and if you ignore them completely in favor of “love,” they might not be as willing to take care of you if and when your relationship ends.

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9. Don’t go in with the intention of “fixing” someone.
No one is perfect, but if you go into a relationship knowing exactly what you want to change about the person, then maybe you shouldn’t go into that relationship in the first place. You cannot control other people, and you should never strive to.

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10. Make time for yourself.
Ultimately, you should be your biggest priority. While it is good to spend time with your significant other, you shouldn’t spend all of your time with him or her. It is important to spend some time alone, focusing only on yourself. You have plenty of time to worry about others.

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11. Mind games are only for players.
If someone is playing the jealousy game with you, it is time to end it. Sure, other people may be attracted to you or your significant other, but flattering as it may be, it shouldn’t matter. And you shouldn’t bring it up in the relationship every chance you get. There is never a reason to try and make someone jealous; if you feel the need to play games, then maybe your relationship isn’t working out.

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12. Be careful about letting friendships develop into more.
Although pop culture would lead us to believe that our best friends are our soulmates, we have to be a little more discerning than that. While we may be compatible and comfortable with those people, the state of the relationship completely changes when you try and turn it into something more. If you don’t stay together, then you may be sacrificing a friendship completely by dating that person. The relationship may be wonderful, but you have to distinguish that before you do anything to alter the course of that friendship.

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13. Don’t place all of your self worth in the relationship.
You are worth more than simply who you are with. A relationship can be great, but it isn’t everything that makes up who you are, and you have to remember that. Regardless of whether or not you are with someone, you still have a lot to offer, and your happiness shouldn’t hinge entirely on how one person feels about you.

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14. If it didn’t work out the first time, it probably won’t ever work out.
There is always that one couple who breaks up and gets back together nearly as often as they change outfits. (Think Sam and Ronnie from Jersey Shore.) Regardless of how they feel about each other at the time, the underlying problems are always there, waiting to cause another scene. When you break up with someone, you have to do so knowing that you will not get back together with that person, especially if they commit one of the major deal-breakers: verbal or physical abuse, cheating on you, etc. None of those things are okay, and you should never accept them by returning to the person who wronged you in the first place.

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15. If you aren’t in a relationship, worry about something else.
There are plenty of perks to being single, and even if you do have someone who catches your eye, you should direct your energy toward other things: keeping your grades up, getting involved in things you love and bettering yourself as a human being. Work on accomplishing your¬†goals that don’t focus entirely on other people.

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What are some of your tips for college relationships? Comment below with your own advice. If there are any other topics you would like to cover in future Freshman 15 articles, please let me know!